Ever try reading in the dark? Okay, you can’t read in the dark, obviously. But I think you get my point. How fast you read, regardless of what course you take, is going to be directly affected by your reading conditions.  It’s obvious that better conditions make for faster reading.

Key things that you ought to do in order to make the most of your reading conditions are as follows:

Proper Lighting

This is probably one of the biggest statement in the history of reading. But do you REALLY know what proper lighting is? Do you know where to place your lighting? Truth is, light in the wrong place can make reading a total nightmare.

Lighting should be placed at an angle so that there is NO glare on the actual reading material. You don’t want a light that is too bright. A standard 120-watt bulb in a properly placed lamp, usually just off to the left or right of you, should be more than enough.

Never try reading in a dark room. That’s a great way to not only slow up your reading speed but kill your eyes in the process.

Proper Seating

Ever try reading when you’re not comfortable? It’s not fun. And believe it or not, sitting in an uncomfortable chair or in an awkward position WILL slow up your reading speed. Comfort is going to be different for each individual so I can’t give any specific tips on seats, positions, etc. When you sit down to read, you WILL know whether or not you’re comfortable because eventually, if you’re not, your neck will begin to hurt or get stiff, not to mention other body parts as well.

It might not seem like a big deal, but the more comfortable you are when reading, the faster you will read.

Proper Temperature

If you’re scratching your head wondering what temperature has to do with reading speed, you might want to read this section very carefully.

Did you ever try reading in a very hot place? What usually happens? You begin to sweat. The pages of your book start to stick together. Your hands are so sweaty that you have trouble turning the pages.

What about when you try reading in a cold place? Your fingers start to get numb. You can’t grip the pages properly. And I haven’t even touched on what happens to your eyes when it’s too hot. Sweat starts to pour into them. Suddenly, you’re spending more time wiping your eyes than reading.

It may not seem like a big deal, but reading at temperatures between 68 and 72 degrees are most ideal for reading speed.

Try reading in a sauna and you’ll see what I mean. These 3 simple environmental tips should greatly increase your reading speed.